For March, we go DIGging even deeper, text versus subtext, past melding into present. Icons emerge or stay the same, styles flourish, seasons bring out new intrigue.
This issue bring us Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Anton Newcombe from Brian Jonestown Massacre, some Liars and These New Puritans.
Later on the Williamsburg Fashion Weekend crashes the scene (is that even this season anymore?), and we get some mind altering submissions.

In This Issue...

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SXSW 2010 Photo Slideshow

SXSW 2010 slideshow: “always updated, not always sensible.”

March 17th, 2010 | Continued
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Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: Better the Devil You Know

On the day in late winter that I catch up with Robert Levon Been of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club there are connection problems. He’s in a place, likely somewhere in California near the band’s home base, with bad reception. Somehow this seems like the perfect backdrop…

March 17th, 2010 | 3 comments | Continued
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Anton Newcombe on the Latest Brian Jonestown Massacre: When Everybody’s an Artist, Nobody is

The newest Brian Jonestown Massacre album, the band’s twelfth studio release, helmed, as usual, by Anton Newcombe, is a multi-cultural, unexpected exploration of beats, genres and tempos, far from any BJM psych-folk you’ve heard before. But don’t call Who Killed Sgt Pepper? a world album, per se.

March 17th, 2010 | 3 comments | Continued
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Liars: Unravelling the Fringe of a Sisterworld

Liars have come a long way since the release of their debut full-length, They Threw Us All in a Trench and Stuck a Monument on Top. That 2001 album, rife with sublime, herky jerky dance beats, was recorded in a mere two days. Critics were quick to peg Liars as one among the pack of revivalists of the NYC post-punk, art/dance rock scene.

March 17th, 2010 | 2 comments | Continued
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These New Puritans: Breaking Their Own Sound Barriers

These New Puritans’ latest art rock opus, Hidden, grabs you like an angular installation of Banks Violette proportions (both minimal and epic at once), yet built with orchestra and electronics rather than meager fiberglass and fluorescent tubes.

March 17th, 2010 | 1 comment | Continued
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The Sweet Plush Pop of Rinat Shingareev

Some of these figures inspire fear and bemusement, they also instill calm with their presence and amuse us with their behavior. Through the eyes of Rinat they are friends to celebrate, understand and use for pop-iconographic work.

March 17th, 2010 | Continued